Future areas of focus for patient-oriented research

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Next step of the online discussion on future areas of focus for patient-oriented research

Thank you to all those who took the time to share their feedback with CIHR. We are currently analyzing the responses received. We will host virtual discussions in the Winter of 2022 to further refine the priorities identified through this interactive platform and other stakeholder engagement activities. We will share a “What We Heard” report summarizing the results by early 2022.

Introduction

Canada’s Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR), created by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) in 2011, is about moving scientific discoveries

Next step of the online discussion on future areas of focus for patient-oriented research

Thank you to all those who took the time to share their feedback with CIHR. We are currently analyzing the responses received. We will host virtual discussions in the Winter of 2022 to further refine the priorities identified through this interactive platform and other stakeholder engagement activities. We will share a “What We Heard” report summarizing the results by early 2022.

Introduction

Canada’s Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR), created by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) in 2011, is about moving scientific discoveries to the bedside and producing the information that decision-makers and health professionals need to improve care. SPOR is a national coalition of federal, provincial and territorial partners, patients and informal caregivers, health authorities, researchers, health professionals, Indigenous communities (i.e., First Nations, Inuit, Métis, and/or Urban Indigenous communities), academic health centres, charities, philanthropic organizations, the private sector and others dedicated to the integration of research into care.

Patient-oriented research, which is foundational to evidence-informed health care, refers to a continuum of research that engages patients, health professionals, decision-makers, researchers and other knowledge users and communities as partners: from initial studies in humans to comparative effectiveness and outcomes research, to the integration of research results into clinical practice and health systems.

The vision for SPOR is to improve health outcomes and enhance the patient experience through the integration of evidence at all levels of health systems in Canada by adhering to the following guiding principles:

  • Patients involved in all aspects of research
  • Decision-makers/clinicians involved to support integration into policy/practice
  • 1:1 matching funding formula with non-federal funding partners
  • A trans-disciplinary approach
  • Performance measurement/evaluation as integral components

SPOR will contribute to the achievement of the CIHR Strategic Plan 2021-2031, including:

  • Priority A: Advance Research Excellence in All Its Diversity
  • Priority B: Strengthen Canadian Health Research Capacity
  • Priority C: Accelerate the Self-Determination of Indigenous Peoples in Health Research
  • Priority D: Pursue Health Equity through Research
  • Priority E: Integrate Evidence in Health Decisions

This strategic plan was informed by stakeholder engagement activities on the future of health research in Canada. A summary of the results, including recommended strategic priority areas, is available on the CIHR website. To support the continued implementation of SPOR, CIHR recognizes the critical need to engage a broad range of stakeholders to inform decision-making regarding areas of focus and priority for future funding opportunities in patient-oriented research. This online forum is one mechanism for gathering input from stakeholders.

Who we’re Inviting

CIHR is pleased to host this open dialogue with those who are, or who wish to be, engaged in patient-oriented research to identify and discuss areas of focus and priority over the next five years. We encourage you to share this consultation broadly with your colleagues, collaborators and networks. If you would like to participate in the consultation but are not able to access the online platform, we would be pleased to facilitate the completion of the survey by phone or mail. Please contact SPORConsultationSRAP@cihr-irsc.gc.ca or call 1-888-603-4178 (toll free) (press 1).

How it Works

Participants will be invited to provide input in two stages:

  • Step 1 (Aug 9-Sept 17): In the Survey tab you are invited to respond to a series of questions about recommended research priorities.
  • Step 2 (Oct 12-29): In the Ideas tab, you are invited to vote on common research priorities identified through the survey. In the Forum tab, we invite you to ask/answer questions, share thoughts and chat with other participants on this topic.

Next Steps

Following this online survey/dialogue, CIHR will host virtual discussions in the Winter of 2022 to further refine the priorities identified through this interactive platform and other stakeholder engagement activities. We will share a “What We Heard” report summarizing the results by early 2022. If you would like to be considered as a participant, please indicate your interest by completing this online registration form. We will endeavor to be inclusive and equitable by engaging participants who reflect the diversity of the Canadian community.

Discussions: All (6) Open (0)
  • How it Works

    about 2 months ago
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    Thank you to everyone who completed Step 1 of the consultation. We have summarized the common themes we heard in the survey. Use the Go to discussion button under each forum to view these themes. 

    Please help us understand each of these themes by expanding on the descriptions provided in the forums. You are welcome to interact with other respondents by asking questions and/or providing comments. 

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  • Forum 1

    about 2 months ago
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    Designing efficient learning health systems focused on patient experiences & outcomes.

    THEME
    DESCRIPTION
    Engagement

    Engaging patients and the public/community in research, policy, and clinical care.

    Examples: Priority setting for research, acknowledgement/payment for participation, training methods, evaluation of the impact of patient/public involvement, best practices for engaging diverse perspectives, ongoing communication between health professionals and patients, shared decision-making, and patient satisfaction.

    Design

    Designing patient-centred health services at the health system-level.

    Examples: Funding models including value-based care, comprehensive public insurance, policy facilitators/barriers, community-based care, staffing and retention, and education and training of health professionals, centralized access to patient information and sustainability.

    Access

    Timely access to health services in emergency and routine/ongoing cases.

    Examples: Wait times in emergency departments and for specialist services.

    Coordination

    Collaboration across sectors and between health organizations/professionals to provide integrated health services and ensure continuity of care.

    Examples: Integration of health and social services, team-based care models, integrated care pathways, and transitions from hospital to home.

    Equity

    Social, economic and/or regional factors contributing to health inequities.

    Examples: Race, ethnicity, religion, citizenship status, language, age, gender, sexual orientation, and location in remote/rural areas.

    Technology

    Best practices for using emerging technologies to deliver health services.

    Examples: Virtual care, artificial intelligence, and personalized medicine.

    Pharmacological Therapies

    Best practices for managing medications in the health sector.

    Examples: Funding/costs, ethical principles, prescribing/de-prescribing, medication information, side effects, adverse drug events, and access to alternative options including nutrition, and psychotherapy services.

    Learning

    Barriers/facilitators to designing a learning health system that continuously learns from itself to provide better patient experiences and outcomes based on evidence.

    Examples: Collection and use of patient-reported measures to identify areas for improvement, knowledge in implementation science to make improvements, and access to tools in data analytics and training in data literacy to learn how to interpret the data generated within a learning system.


    Use the Reply button to expand on the descriptions provided for each theme below.

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  • Forum 2

    about 2 months ago
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    Optimizing the role of primary care within a health system.

    THEME
    DESCRIPTION
    Primary Care

    Delivering patient-centred primary care services.

    Examples: Funding, access, coordination/integration, and role in chronic disease management.


    Use the Reply button to expand on the theme's description below.

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  • Forum 3

    about 2 months ago
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    Meeting the needs of specific populations within a health system.

    THEME
    DESCRIPTION
    Indigenous Peoples

    Priorities to understand, include, improve and promote the health equity for all Indigenous peoples in Canada.

    Examples: Health system design, access and cultural safety.

    Children and Youth

    Providing patient-centred health services to children and youth, and supporting parents/caregivers.

    Examples: Early intervention, school integration, mental health services, and pediatric to adult transition programs.

    Seniors

    Investing in healthy aging, providing patient-centred health services to seniors, and supporting families/caregivers.

    Examples: Home care, long-term care, and polypharmacy.

    Palliative and 
    End-of-Life Care

    Providing palliative and end-of-life care services in the community.

    Examples: Home care, long-term care, and ethical framework for Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD).


    Use the Reply button to expand on the descriptions provided for each theme below.

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  • Forum 4

    about 2 months ago
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     Managing common health conditions within a health system.

    THEME
    DESCRIPTION
    Chronic Diseases

    Preventing, managing and treating chronic diseases including chronic pain, cancer, obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

    Examples: Lifestyle changes, and self-management education programs.

    Mental Health and Addiction

    Providing patient-centred mental health and addiction services.

    Examples: Addressing stigma, improving access/coverage and treatment outcomes, and managing opioid dependence.


    Use the Reply button to expand on the descriptions provided for each theme below.

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  • Forum 5

    about 2 months ago
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    Mitigating emerging threats to a health system.

    THEME
    DESCRIPTION
    Environment

    Impact of changes in the environment on health.

    Examples: Climate change, air pollution, and access to clean drinking water.

    Pandemic

    Infectious diseases, pandemic preparedness, vaccine, and recovery.

    Examples: Vaccine hesitancy and long-term effects of Covid-19.


    Use the Reply button to expand on the descriptions provided for each theme below.

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Page last updated: 01 November 2021, 09:18